DieKopf

scienceisbeauty:

Electron flow paths in a two dimensional electron gas (computer simulation)
Credit&Source: Eric J. Heller (Resonance Fine Art), Transport VI

scienceisbeauty:

Electron flow paths in a two dimensional electron gas (computer simulation)

Credit&Source: Eric J. Heller (Resonance Fine Art), Transport VI

schattenherz:

ohhhh, life (by Helena Barker)

schattenherz:

ohhhh, life (by Helena Barker)

(Source: splitterherzen, via jovana-s)

thatscienceguy:

When glass breaks, the cracks move at around 3000 Miles per hour!! (4500km/h!) That’s why, even in slow motion, the main cracks in the glass appear virtually instantly as the hammer hits.

thatscienceguy:

When glass breaks, the cracks move at around 3000 Miles per hour!! (4500km/h!) That’s why, even in slow motion, the main cracks in the glass appear virtually instantly as the hammer hits.

(via physicsphysics)

(Source: kenobi-wan-obi)

(Source: re-canvased, via m0rtality)

kenobi-wan-obi:

Perseid meteor shower 2013 from China
neuraldamage:

Phobos
(via Science › Astronomy)

“[…] everything good and bad left an emptiness when it stopped. But if it was bad, the emptiness filled up by itself. If it was good you could only fill it by finding something better.”

—   Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast (via vasudhapande)

“Happiness in intelligent people is the rarest thing I know.”

—   Ernest Hemingway (via wearethieves)
1youion:

take a distance from your godtake a distance from yourselftake a distance from your hearttake a distance from your soultake a distance from your friendstake a distance from your mindtake a distance from yourselftake a distance from your god

1youion:

take a distance from your god
take a distance from yourself
take a distance from your heart
take a distance from your soul
take a distance from your friends
take a distance from your mind
take a distance from yourself
take a distance from your god

(Source: gifmovie)

woodendreams:

(by Bernard Chen)

Love.
sciencenote:

By fitting a theoretical model of the composition of the Universe to the combined set of cosmological observations, scientists have come up with the composition that we described above, ~70% dark energy, ~25% dark matter, ~5% normal matter. What is dark matter?
We are much more certain what dark matter is not than we are what it is. First, it is dark, meaning that it is not in the form of stars and planets that we see. Observations show that there is far too little visible matter in the Universe to make up the 25% required by the observations. Second, it is not in the form of dark clouds of normal matter, matter made up of particles called baryons. We know this because we would be able to detect baryonic clouds by their absorption of radiation passing through them. Third, dark matter is not antimatter, because we do not see the unique gamma rays that are produced when antimatter annihilates with matter. Finally, we can rule out large galaxy-sized black holes on the basis of how many gravitational lenses we see. High concentrations of matter bend light passing near them from objects further away, but we do not see enough lensing events to suggest that such objects to make up the required 25% dark matter contribution.

sciencenote:

By fitting a theoretical model of the composition of the Universe to the combined set of cosmological observations, scientists have come up with the composition that we described above, ~70% dark energy, ~25% dark matter, ~5% normal matter. What is dark matter?

We are much more certain what dark matter is not than we are what it is. First, it is dark, meaning that it is not in the form of stars and planets that we see. Observations show that there is far too little visible matter in the Universe to make up the 25% required by the observations. Second, it is not in the form of dark clouds of normal matter, matter made up of particles called baryons. We know this because we would be able to detect baryonic clouds by their absorption of radiation passing through them. Third, dark matter is not antimatter, because we do not see the unique gamma rays that are produced when antimatter annihilates with matter. Finally, we can rule out large galaxy-sized black holes on the basis of how many gravitational lenses we see. High concentrations of matter bend light passing near them from objects further away, but we do not see enough lensing events to suggest that such objects to make up the required 25% dark matter contribution.One of the most complicated and dramatic collisions between galaxy clusters ever seen is captured in this new composite image of Abell 2744. The blue shows a map of the total mass concentration (mostly dark matter).

(via sciencenote)